Promoting Self-Determination and More Positive Transition Outcomes: The Self-Determined Learning Model of Instruction

 

Sponsored by NTACT, Michael Wehmeyer identifies how the Self-Determined Learning Model of Instruction can be implemented in classrooms and throughout a district. Also learn about a new self-determination assessment, the Self-Determination Inventory.

 

LIVE PRESENTATION:  June 16, 2016    Recording Available.

ONLINE DISCUSSION: Questions & answers with Mike Wehmeyer.

Download resources for this Webinar below
  • SDLMI Teacher's Guide_2.0

  • Wehmeyer SD and SDLMI NTACT Webinar Handouts

  • Join the Discussion!

    Let’s start with your greatest needs and concerns about self-determination for young adults with disabilities.

    What additional resources or support do you need to implement or improve self-determination instruction and opportunities for your students? Post your questions and replies.

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    dlattin@ku.edu
    Admin
    5 years ago

    You might cover this during your presentation, but I was wondering if I wanted to use the SDLMI with students, would I need to provide any preparation instruction on topics like knowing you disability, learning preferences, etc.?

    Michael Wehmeyer
    Michael Wehmeyer
    5 years ago

    No, you wouldn’t need to do that, the process doesn’t require any preparation, but you may need to use the process to address issues such as that when you go through it with a student.

    dlattin@ku.edu
    Admin
    5 years ago

    Hi Mike. One of the participants in yesterday’s event has a good question that others may have as well.

    What are effective practices to integrate into our daily schedule to support students with severe or multiple disabilities?

    Michael Wehmeyer
    Michael Wehmeyer
    5 years ago

    In the education of students with severe disabilities, we abide by a couple of “basic principles” suggested by Lou Brown and colleagues.

    First is the principle of maximal participation, noting that people with severe disabilities have the right to maximally participate in their lives and in activities that impact the quality of their lives.

    Second, we achieve the principal of maximal participation by the principle of partial participation, which states that although a person may not be able to perform every step in a task, that person has the right to participate in all steps in which he or she can. Educating learners with severe disabilities is about breaking complex tasks into steps and teaching students skills that enable them to complete a task or identifying a support that enables the task to be done. The same is the case for promoting self-determination.

    Obviously, promoting choice opportunity is a huge issue, and students with severe disabilities have far fewer opportunities than their peers to make choices, but the same is true for participation in goal setting, problem solving, decision making, self-management or self-regulation, and so forth. Remember that being self-determined is about making things happen in one’s life, not about doing everything independently.

    The SDLMI can provide a structure to enable learners with severe disabilities to maximally participate in goal setting and attainment. It’s important to focus on enabling youth with severe disabilities to self-monitor and self-evaluate progress toward goals. Mainly, it’s about giving youth with severe disabilities opportunities.

    dlattin@ku.edu
    Admin
    5 years ago

    Here’s another great question that a viewer had – MANY of you probably have good ideas to share!

    What ideas do people have to help student focus on their POSITIVE traits, abilities etc., not their limitations?

    Michael Wehmeyer
    Michael Wehmeyer
    5 years ago

    We’ve done some cool stuff with the VIA Character survey. Go to http://www.viacharacter.org/resources/guide-to-using-the-via-youth-survey-with-children-with-intellectual-disabilities/ and you can find information about using this “character strengths” survey. Then go to https://www.researchgate.net/publication/294427739_Character_Strengths_and_Intellectual_and_Developmental_Disability_A_Strengths-Based_Approach_from_Positive_Psychology and you can see the paper we’ve written on this topic, including some interventions.

    Liza Knowles
    Liza Knowles
    5 years ago

    Hi Dr. Wehmeyer, I wanted to thank you for your presentation last Thursday on the SDLMI. I have a new understanding of self determination and appreciate the efforts to bring these important ideas to others. When a person deals with a disability, it is essentially something that they had no choice in, which then must be dealt with in very personal way, everyday. So I believe that the more a person with a disability can develop a sense of agency within their lives from that point on, and exercise volition over the remaining choices, the healthier they will be. I work as a technical assistance provider, with transition teams, and want to know how to encourage the teams (teachers and transition specialists) to implement this program within the transition framework and incorporate self-determination in the classroom and also in work experiences.

    Michael Wehmeyer
    Michael Wehmeyer
    5 years ago

    Thanks for your kind remarks. So, how to get more people to use the SDLMI (or other evidence-based practices to promote self-determination) has been on our mind a lot lately. We have evidence that this is important and effective, and yet such practices remain limited. So, with regard to your role, I think the general structure I used for my presentation is how I would approach this. That is, begin broadly with the social validity of issues pertaining to self-determination, then provide information on what is meant by self-determination, then provide information on the impact of self-determination on school and adult outcomes, and then go through the intervention. I think we have the evidence to justify to teachers that this will result in positive benefits for their students.

    Kelli
    Kelli
    5 years ago

    Hi Dr. Wehmeyer, I was not able to make your webinar but can you talk a little bit about the important role of self-determination for younger students (at age 14 or earlier) as we look at implementing WIOA and pre-employment transition services. How can we better prepare community partners (e.g., VR) working with educators to promote self-determination skills in the students we work with to prepare for college and careers? Do you recommend specific strategies?

    Michael Wehmeyer
    Michael Wehmeyer
    5 years ago

    Hi Kelli,

    We’ve always conceptualized self-determination in a developmental framework. It emerges as a disposition during adolescents, but it is the acquisition of skills, knowledge, and abilities, as well as opportunities and experiences, from birth onward that enable that development. So, experiences making choices, solving problems, engaging in decisions, etc. are critical for children at all phases of education. As for working with partners and preparing for college and career, the strategy I talked about was the Self-Determined Learning Model of Instruction (and its companion, the Self-Determined Career Development Model) and if you go to http://ngsd.org/everyone/ngsd-products you can get information about those and more, including the role of self-determination in the transition to college.

    Amanda Hinds
    Amanda Hinds
    4 years ago

    This training was good to give me direction on what type of program to lay out for my students. It helps to see the direction I should create and to know the outcomes to expect. I cannot find the teacher resource that was mentioned toward the end of the presentation. I see there is a Parent guide, but I do not see a Teacher guide. Is this in a different portion of the website?

    Rachel Schirmer
    Rachel Schirmer
    4 years ago

    In regards to the slide showing the wage gap, is receiving benefits a variable that was accounted for in people with disabilities choosing lower paying jobs knowing that they cannot earn above a certain amount in order to be able to retain benefits?