Transition Considerations for Youth with Complex Support Needs

 

Join the Discussion!

Please enter the following information before accessing resources on our site. Thank you.

0 0 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Subscribe me to
guest
47 Comments
oldest
newest most voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Holly Schwietz
Holly Schwietz
2 years ago

Great information!

Monique LeTourneau
Monique LeTourneau
2 years ago

The case study CaPromise was really helpful. And the tools, general points, etc. Thanks!

Kimberly Johnson
Kimberly Johnson
2 years ago

This is a good webinar! Thanks so much!

sydney verne
sydney verne
2 years ago

thanks…..how do I subscribe though?

Charlie Walters
Charlie Walters
2 years ago

Thank you to everyone able to make it today! Looking forward to some good discussion with you all here!

Christa Knaak
Christa Knaak
2 years ago

Thanks for the info!

Sheri Ransom
Sheri Ransom
2 years ago

Thank you so much, I don’t think we address the students with complex needs as often as we should when thinking of transition.

Charlie Walters
Charlie Walters
2 years ago
Reply to  Sheri Ransom

Thank you for being there, Sheri! I wholeheartedly agree – we tend to keep things pretty general and don’t always hit the complications head on… Are there any areas that would be helpful to cover in more detail in the future?

Sheri Ransom
Sheri Ransom
2 years ago

Assessments for MDS students nonverbal. I have three who are turning transition age and assessments will need to be completed in the three key areas. Our team is trying to figure out where to go for resources.

Judith Imperatore
Judith Imperatore
2 years ago
Reply to  Sheri Ransom

Your turn
Hello Sheri. I’d be glad to share our resources. We’ve been doing assessment for these students for many years.

Judith Imperatore
Judith Imperatore
2 years ago
Reply to  Michael Stoehr

I’d love to. Just have to figure it out. I’ll email them to you and perhaps you can attach them?

Andrea Martin
Andrea Martin
2 years ago

Thank you! I am excited to check out the Life Course Framework.

Patricia L Anderson
Patricia L Anderson
2 years ago

In terms of the student with allergies as well as other disabilities (VI, HI, CP), we have done PCP with this student twice – but most likely not as much follow through as possible. We plan to try the LifeCourse Planning. And I would like to get him into Customized Employment. One of the primary difficulties, however, is the difficulty the parent has letting this student try different things other than just what he “wants” to do – which may or may not be appropriate yet. Any suggestions about how to help the parents through this process while also encouraging the student to be as self-determined as possible? p

Charlie Walters
Charlie Walters
2 years ago

Hey Patricia! Great question and such a common issue, right? I have two answers, although I know that Michael, Linda, and lots of other folks probably have some valuable input to add, too! The first relates to this issue in general, and that is, how do we in local areas better convey the mission of SPED supports and services to families throughout the lifespan? Do families know that we’re aiming for self-determined students pursuing fulfilling lives, integrated into their communities? If not, how can we better communicate the aim of SPED as students age? Student-led IEP meetings? Earlier transition planning or transition meetings outside of the annual review IEP meeting? Lots of possibility there. Secondly, and more to your point, I used to frequently think when I worked in an inclusive college program for students with ID that 99% of the “intervention” was just getting the parents to drop the students off to live on campus. From there, so much tension on the expectations of parents and the self-determination of students seemed to be just a minor detail. I’ve seen something similar on a smaller scale with youth development events like Youth Leadership Forum – something that lets parents know it’s ok to let go while empowering youth to confidently step into some of that responsibility can make all the difference in the world. On the self-determination front, really anything we can do to connect youth to their empowered peers with disabilities for mentoring is huge!

Patricia L Anderson
Patricia L Anderson
2 years ago

Thanks Charlie. Actually I am glad you brought up the YLF. I encouraged parent to attend the final luncheon this year with the idea that we could get the son to YLF within the next two years. Mom indicated that he could do all of the leadership, self-advocacy stuff but that YLF could not accommodate his allergies. We have some work to do there but I hope we can pull it off within the next few years. I wholly agree with your perspective! Thanks for the reminder and support.

Patricia L Anderson
Patricia L Anderson
2 years ago
Reply to  Michael Stoehr

Great points Michael. We have a PPT on Monday and I will bring some of these ideas up. Fortunately we have 4 more years to work on this but forward progress is slow. We are now making EVERYTHING about transition so hopefully we will begin to more forward soon. I like your second comment in particular (although I am really gung ho on the discovery process for this student – hope I can find a vendor soon) and although they have had several PCP sessions I was not a part of those and the results don’t seem to be being used or discussed. I am pushing for some LifeCourse Planning to help flush out the points you made. Thanks again.

Patricia L Anderson
Patricia L Anderson
2 years ago
Reply to  Michael Stoehr

Thanks you so much Michael and Linda – Will look at the resources you sent and be in touch if we would like the documents you mentioned in another form. Much appreciated.

However, I am not able to find the PPoint or other forms – are they posted on the Transition Coalition website or somewhere else. You are welcome to send them to me directly ([email protected]) – Thanks.

Allison Unruh
2 years ago

Hey all! This was a great Ask the Expert, thanks for your interest and participation! I wanted to let you know that there is a technical glitch with the emails going out every time someone comments. We are working to get that fixed so you will just receive ONE a day if you are subscribed to the discussion (go to the green box and click on the drop down next to subscribe if you are interested).
In the meantime, please forgive us for the multiple emails and thanks again!!

Also, I will post the resources above over the next two weeks. Keep on the lookout for those!

Dixie Periman
Dixie Periman
2 years ago

I cannot download the resources from yesterday’s webinar. It says popup window blocked. Do you know how I can fix this issue?

April Green
April Green
2 years ago

I am looking for the recording of the live session. I would like to go back and watch it again. Does anyone have the link they can share?

Kathy
Kathy
2 years ago

For Linda: When you said with the right “marketing” families attended in higher numbers to events. Could could you describe that marketing?

Kathy
Kathy
2 years ago
Reply to  Michael Stoehr

Thank you for the information! Those are all great examples and really liked adding that once trust was established families were open to training opportunities. Important piece to consider when holding events. We have had statewide Community Conversations around employment through “Promise” and other employment first initiatives!

Kathy
Kathy
2 years ago
Reply to  Michael Stoehr

Just saw this. Yes I would like those references. I will email you!
This Ask the Expert is a great format!

Kathy
Kathy
2 years ago

Michael: I tried to link to the AT assessment but went to a bigger website and could not locate it.
Could it be posted to this site?

Kathy
Kathy
2 years ago
Reply to  Michael Stoehr

Thanks Mike! These will be great additions to our Assessment Resource LiveBinder for teachers here in WI. We also have some of these tools in our Self Advocacy Curriculum! Great information!

Kathy
Kathy
2 years ago
Reply to  Michael Stoehr

I did have the Canfield Reed resources…..I am in Wisconsin! 🙂 Always looking for more….every changing need .

Courtney Kallas
Courtney Kallas
2 years ago
Reply to  Michael Stoehr

THANK YOU! It took me a second to get back to this page and really appreciate all the follow up and resource sharing.

Courtney Kallas
Courtney Kallas
2 years ago

I am working with my team to find some research that we can use to “level set” expecations for brainstorming appropriate student artifacts for a graduation capstone portfolio for our teachers working with youth with complex support needs.

Could you point me in the direction of an article or the name of a researcher/research team that has explored the impact of high expectations in transition planning in all areas for youth with complex support needs? THANKS for any help.

I’d love to have an article or two to use as a frame for our teachers to reflect on as they work together.

Courtney Kallas
Courtney Kallas
2 years ago
Reply to  Michael Stoehr

I downloaded all the different resources from here — THANK YOU. This is very helpful — I’m glad I made time for this webinar — usually I sign up for them and something else comes up. All the different pieces you three touched on in that short hour are things I needed to get focused on again and dig into as I collaborate with others to start some new projects to raise expectations and the relevancy of transition services we provide for our youth with complex support needs.

Allison Unruh
2 years ago

New resources added! A few more to come.

Judith Imperatore
Judith Imperatore
2 years ago

All. Thank you for this webinar. The your suggestions for focus was practical to transition and positive trajectory for adult life. We all cannot hear enough about high expectations and how that context drives success for students. Thank you!
!!
My curiosity (more than a question) was the absences of information about transition assessment. Without assessment, individualization can’t happen. I won’t go into that…but…Person Centered Planning is a wonderful tool which you did mention- one that has a history of creation during the deinstitutionalization period when folks had no input. Thankfully, IDEA builds into its mandates everyone’s voice. (Whether schools pay attention to that is another drama!).
But I have been witness to many states using a PCP meeting as an assessment tool and there ONLY assessment tool. However, rarely, if ever, have I seen this “informal” gathering produce data in which then informs the IEP.

In a PCP a student can express their desire, but whether that desire is triangulated with industry standards, natural skills, potential for training, etc. – it means nothing in preparing relevant, MEANINGFUL, postsecondary goals that then drive the IEP.

Please don’t leave comprehensive transition assessment out of your presentations – it’s the cornerstone to all transition planning. And, PCP is great – but it MUST jump from a friendly discussion to relevant evaluation in the IEP.

Shannonb Corkrean
Shannonb Corkrean
2 years ago

Can I have the citation from Charlie’s presentation re: the study that talked about how guardianship doesn’t necessarily equate to safer and more quality of life. I am very interested in that area. Thank you!

Charlie Walters
Charlie Walters
2 years ago

What an awesome question and super cool area of interest. As far as I know, nobody has conducted a systematic review of the literature on this specific topic or conducted a study that looks at something like the quality of life for persons under guardianship versus those who are not. I’ve explored the literature on the topic for some time now, and have never come across anything like that, however. The issue is really how alarming it is that, even if there may be some sort of isolated finding that promotes guardianship on the basis of quality of life, it would be a drop in the bucket compared to the frequency with which guardianship is pursued. I’m not sure of anything we do more consistently and with less evidence (or no evidence!). Does that make sense? I hope I wasn’t too misleading in how I presented that tidbit!
Another way of talking about this is in what we know about self-determination. Folks under guardianship have been shown to be more self-determined, and self-determination has been linked to everything from preventing sexual abuse/exploitation for women with ID to quality of life, employment, and so much more. So many of the things that are said about guardianship are really more about self-determination than they are based on what we know about guardianship from research. It’s a bit of a leap but pretty well accepted at this point.

Here are some of my very favorite articles on the topic for some good sources you may or may not have already taken a look at:

Zhang, D., [email protected] ed., Walker, J. M. ., Leal, D. R. ., Landmark, L. J., & Katsiyannis, A. (2019). A
Call to Society for Supported Decision-Making: Theoretical and Legal Reasoning. Journal of Child &
Family Studies, 28(7), 1803–1814.

Rood, C. E., Kanter, A., & Causton, J. (2014). Presumption of Incompetence: The Systematic Assignment
of Guardianship Within the Transition Process. Research & Practice for Persons with Severe
Disabilities, 39(4), 319–328.

Millar, D. S. (2014b). Extending Transition to Address Guardianship Alternatives: An Issue Concerning
Students who have Intellectual Disability. Education & Training in Autism & Developmental
Disabilities, 49(3), 449. (really anything by Millar on the topic!)

Jameson, J. M., Riesen, T., Polychronis, S., Trader, B., Mizner, S., Martinis, J., & Hoyle, D. (2015b).
Guardianship and the Potential of Supported Decision Making With Individuals With Disabilities.
Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities, 40(1), 36–51.

The National Council on Disability realeased a great report on the subject this year, too:
National Council on Disability (U.S.) (Ed.). (2018). Beyond guardianship: toward alternatives that
promote greater self-determination. Washington, DC: National Council on Disability.

And I’m a little behind in getting to it (I only ordered my copy last week!), but some amazing folks recently published the first SDM textbook. I’m willing to bet it’s probably great if you’re looking for some extended reading on the topic.
Shogren, K. A., Wehmeyer, M. L., Martinis, J., Blanck, P. D., & Turnbull, H. R. (2019). Supported
decision-making: theory, research, and practice to enhance self-determination and quality of life.
Cambridge, United Kingdom ; New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press.

If I can be a resource to you on anything else related to all of this, I’m happy to help!

Allison Unruh
2 years ago

The new resources Michael mentioned earlier this week are now posted. Let me know if there are any missing!

47
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x